Universal Credit : 150,000 single working mums worse off – Save the Children

Save The Children has published it’s report “Ending Child Poverty: Ensuring Universal Credit supports working mums”

The report outlines that “The design of Universal Credit should result in improved work incentives and boosts in income for many working families but lack of funding threatens to weaken its impact on child poverty and supporting women into work. New research compiled for Save the Children shows that single parents working longer hours (16 hours or more) on low pay and some second earners will be substantially worse off under the new system. This has serious consequences for children in these families. The impact on single parents alone could push 250,000 children deeper into poverty.”

The report concludes “It is crucial that Universal Credit provides sufficient incentives to parents to move into decent work that offers a sustainable route out of poverty. As the economy recovers, mothers must not be further disadvantaged in the labour market through the introduction of Universal Credit. Instead, it should offer them a means of re-establishing themselves in the labour market following a period of increasing female unemployment. The ability of mothers to work – whether they are single parents or part of a couple – has a significant bearing on whether a family is poor or not. 34 As the figures in this report suggest, the ability of second earners (often mothers) in couple families to bring in a second wage, or the ability of single parents to secure full-time employment, can significantly reduce the risk of poverty.”

Please visit Save the Children

How does this affect you? What are your views on the new Universal Credit system?

 

4 Comments

  1. Heidi Raper says:

    Im a single parent thats just gone back into work. I work 16 hours on minimum wage.Ive seen on the news that single parents will be up to £60 a week worse off once the universal credit comes in.Im £60 a week better off while im working.Next year i’ll be worse off , i may aswell go back on benefits and get my rent etc paid. What is the point ????

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  2. Christine Anderson says:

    I’m a single mom who is only £56 a week better off working 25hours a week! If they stop £60 a week I will be worse off in work! Why don’t they take off the couples that are able to work but don’t! Rather than the hard workers! Like the other lady stated WHAT’S THE POINT? Will be pushed back onto benefits : ((((((

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  3. Joanne Fox says:

    I feel like a large chunk of the society are totally missing the point of ‘work’ here. Money is obviously a massive factor, I do not dispute that, I myself have 2 children and have been on the wrong end of affording childcare in the past, however, as a single mum I worked for minimum wage I worked hard and I opened up my career possibilities by doing so. I gained great satisfaction and fulfillment from going to work, providing for my family and also maintaining my dignity and self pride. That then gave me confidence to move on, try new things and generally fit in better and easier with the ‘working environment’. I feel gaining experience, maintaining dignity and pride along with providing a great example to our next generation is as important when making a decision on whether we work or not.

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  4. Becky Parks says:

    i am a single mother who works 16 hours a wk and under the new proposals i will be worse off. as the above woman states yes working does onders for yr dignity and pride but how proud will you be if u cant afford to feed yr children because we’re paying more in childcare (my son has only been in childcare for 8 months and fees have gone up twice in that time) and now the ‘help’ i was receiving has now been reduced but not only that the new Universal Credit will leave me worse off again. I must quit my job, i have no choice whatsoever. i will be better off on benefits and that disgusts me. get this goverment out next election. they are living with blinders on.

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